Nested Pair


Dear Technoid,

I occasionally have read the term “nested pair” in reference to sporting clays, but have never seen it defined. Can you explain what a “nested pair” is.

Keep up the good work and thanks!

Kenneth

Dear Kenneth,

The neatest “nested pair” that I can remember seeing was at Addieville, RI. It was a 60 mm target tucked inside a 110. Sometimes they would separate when thrown, but usually the 60 would stay under the 110 for a bit. I remember whacking the 110 and confidently starting to dismount my gun. The little 60 kept going out of that pile of chips like an escape pod from the Enterprise.

Battues are often nested also as two battues placed together are close to the thickness of a standard 110, most machines can throw this stacked or nested pair off of a conventional arm.

Best regards,

Bruce Buck
Shotgun Report’s Technoid
(Often in error, never in doubt.)

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2 Responses to Nested Pair

  1. jon bastable says:

    Love “true-pairs”…hope to hit both with one shot!

    Like

  2. Kelly says:

    Love nested pairs, as every set can be different. I typically shoot 1 1/8 of #8 at almost everything (gas gun). But on nested pairs I reach into my bag and load #7.5 for the first shot in the hope (prayer?) that the additional energy will carry through and keep the nested mini/midi from escaping the debris field (“…escape pod from the Enterprise”. Hah!). Depending on the yardage might even load a cloud of #9 for the hopefully not needed second shot to get some increased pattern density for the smaller clay.

    Like

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